• A scholarship opens a door to serving others
  • Finding fellowship with the Appalachian Family
  • The art of success
  • Inspired to succeed
  • A support system for academic achievement
  • A Rich Learning Experience
  • Vargas’ year in France affirms self-reliance, inspires him to give back
  • A real-world learning lab
  • Taking sustainable living to a new level
  • Hope finds her passion

Center for Judaic, Holocaust and Peace Studies

“Those who cannot remember the past are doomed to repeat it." - George Santayana

The Most Vital Education Mission of Our Time

Genocide is a crime so heinous, so enormous, it’s hard to think about, more difficult to write or teach about, and harder still to teach. Yet teach it we must, because genocide is nothing less than a government’s policy decision to eliminate an entire people from this planet.

The Nazi Holocaust is the most numerically horrific, the most systematically implemented, the most nearly successful example in history—and for many, the example that hits closest to home. But it is not the only example that haunts humankind and people of conscience. The list that should never have begun keeps growing.

Since 2002, Appalachian’s Center for Judaic, Holocaust and Peace Studies has provided opportunities and resources for teaching the history and meaning of the Holocaust and other genocides—in the hope that we might help keep them from happening again.

Help Enrich a Legacy of Teaching Tolerance

Your contribution helps expand our efforts to teach tolerance, promote understanding and explore peaceful avenues to human improvement. Your support today will ensure a bright future for our students and our community, and helps change the world for a better tomorrow.

What We’re Doing About It

The center employs faculty who teach undergraduate courses in Judaic, Holocaust and Peace Studies, presents public lectures and a film series and leads study-abroad trips to Europe. Each summer, it presents an annual summer symposium featuring notable scholars and speakers.

Additionally, scholarships are provided to public schoolteachers to further their professional development and teach the Holocaust to thousands of children in the U.S. and Europe. The Center supports a lecture bureau of scholars, Holocaust survivors and other speakers for community and school events, and houses a reading lab, a library acquisitions program and a teaching resource center for Judaic, Holocaust and Peace Studies.

Funding Priorities

Undergraduate minor

This 18-hour, minor program of study in Judaic, Holocaust and Peace Studies will build upon a rich offering of courses currently taught in the Philosophy and Religion, History, Political Science, Sociology, Business and English departments.

Visiting Scholars Program

Each semester, academics from across the nation and the globe will come to Appalachian as scholars-in-residence, as well as participants in a scholarly lecture series.

Faculty Development

Cross-campus, interdisciplinary cooperation and faculty development opportunities in the study of diversity is key to the mission of the center.

Endowment Program

The continued operation and growth of the center depend on strong annual giving and grant-writing programs. An endowment will provide a strong base of support for these endeavors.

Giving Levels

 <$179$180$500$1,000$2,500$5,000+
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